To Tell or Not to Tell?

By Laurie Breitner

Your healthcare practice is doing well. After some tough beginning years you’ve added partners and pulled away from the pack by learning not only how to survive — but better yet — how to thrive in a changing regulatory climate.

You and your partners feel it’s time to expand geographically. You found a practice in a nearby town that seems to present an opportunity. Despite their large patient base, they aren’t doing as well as they might financially and the senior partners are ready to retire. A deal is struck and a take over date picked — three months hence. You plan to keep the current support staff and remaining clinicians at the current location, and expect to retain the bulk of the patients, reasoning the key to that is staff retention.

Only your partners and a couple senior staff are included in transition planning. No else one in your current operation and no one at all in the “new” practice is informed, which raises the question: when do we let everyone else know?

A couple of your partners argue for immediate and full disclosure. Get everyone together, share the good news — because it really is good news — and get them involved in the transition.  They feel some staff might leave, but overall, there would be better buy-in.

Others are concerned about staff in the acquired practice seeking employment elsewhere over the course of the next three months. Who would want to stay on knowing that they would have to cope with a transition? Better to tell them the day the transition is effective. There might be some initial discontent, but if they were told on Monday morning, they’d have to pull together to serve the patients scheduled to arrive.

There is no consensus. You’re the one who started this practice. All eyes are on you. What do you say?

First take a deep breath. Ask yourself, what are you trying to accomplish?

This is a long-term play and in the long run you want a larger, financially viable practice. You know that while patients are often loyal to their doctors, it’s the staff that keeps the business on track. Schedulers, billing staff, nurses, and technicians support you and your partners. Can you really afford to keep them in the dark? Is that a way to start a new relationship? How would you feel if the roles were reversed?

Is there another way? You have an opportunity to build a good long-term relationship with the new team, which should minimize possible turnover in your current operation and in the one you’re acquiring. A little selling is involved. So, get the group together and tell them the good news. Plan to have one-on-ones with (at a minimum) key staff — ideally everyone — to answer their questions, make new staff feel welcome, and current staff feel appreciated. Hear, and if possible use, their ideas for the transition. Listen to those who mourn the loss of what was; those feelings will pass more quickly if they are acknowledged. Let everyone know how much you respect and appreciate them. Encourage them to be part of the future you envision.

Remind yourself and others that this good thing for both practices. There will be more opportunity for staff advancement, better job security, and additional coverage. Patients will have more choices of locations and practitioners and perhaps even longer office hours — one office could cover early hours and the other late; there would be many possibilities with a bigger practice.

Keep everyone informed of progress or even lack thereof. Email or written updates posted where everyone will see the latest news will suffice between formal meetings. Show your appreciation for all the hard work and acknowledge the extra work that your current and new staff does to make the transition go smoothly. Consider some kind of celebration to start building those critical relationships between people.

Wouldn’t it feel better to start off this new chapter with honest communication as a foundation for future employee-employer relationships? Once past this hurdle, you can turn to the question of how best to inform future patients and others in your new community.

© Copyright 2013 Laurie Breitner. All rights reserved.

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