From New Employee to Productive Colleague

By Laurie Breitner

09-01-13 image for LCB postAs I write this I’m watching a parade of  students being introduced to their new environment. Colleges and universities have a lot of practice doing this; each fall they handle an influx of new students, make them welcome and integrate them into an existing culture — that is, they lay the foundation for students’ success in college and beyond. Few businesses do that so routinely. Should your business take a page from their playbook and put in place practices to orient and engage new employees? This HBR post by John Baldoni speaks to the many possible payoffs for companies with more engaged employees.

While each workplace is unique, here are a few essentials to consider when putting together your employee orientation program.

1) Overview – Incoming employees who understand your organization and how their new role fits in it will be better able to contribute. In addition to one-on-ones with supervisors and human resource staff, provide information about your company’s “big picture” — ideally in an online repository that can be kept current. Include your mission, vision, and annual company-wide and department goals and, of course, how they are measured. Each employee should be given an up-to-date job description for their role (and, ideally, everyone else’s), an employee handbook, and be informed about your performance evaluation process including any probationary period. Other helpful information is your company organization chart, and background material that describe your company’s products and services, target market(s) and, if appropriate, major customers and influencers.

2) The basics – At minimum everyone should have access to your company directory with telephone numbers, email addresses and office locations. Is there a calendar of planned meetings, social events and holidays? Do most departments have set periodic meetings, and if so, who leads them, creates agendas and where are they held? Include information about how people typically dress and details of what you mean by, for example, “business casual.” Consider using candid photos of current employees (with names beneath) so people can start putting names with faces and see examples of how people dress. Long before Facebook (the company), schools routinely created a school face book of all students including names, what they like to be called (e.g., he prefers James, never Jim or Jimmy), their dorm and interests. Could something like that work at your business?

And, there are practical matters. Who buys/makes the coffee? Do employees take turns on KP (kitchen patrol) or is that duty assigned to a particular employee or cleaning service? Is the refrigerator emptied every Friday of all but marked items? What do new employees need to feel a valued part of your organization?

3) Resources – There’s a lot to find out. Do you have a company intranet or other data repositories? New employees will feel more welcomed and become productive more quickly if you save them the trouble of having to hunt for routine information such as reserving conference rooms, the location of the supply closet, and office kitchen. Outside-the-office information such as area restaurants (menus and how to get there) or places to exercise and shop are helpful.

4) Mentor – Even with all this, newbies may have questions or concerns they feel uncomfortable raising with a superior or co-worker. Or, they might need guidance on company culture. If you have more than a handful of employees, consider pairing each new employee with a seasoned worker, ideally not a boss. Clearly the mentor must have the right interpersonal skills, volunteer, and enjoy the responsibility. Surveys consistently report that a top reason people give for being happy at work is whether they have a friend, e.g., feel personally connected. I am amazed at how long some of these relationships persist. In the late nineties I paired a new employee (from India, as it happened) with a willing mentor. They are still friends almost 20 years later.

What specific challenges will employees face in your organization? To get in touch with what new employees need, think back to jobs you have had and your first day or first week; involve current employees in putting information together. Given the expense of recruiting and hiring, it makes sense to invest a little more to give your new hires a good foundation for their — and by extension, your company’s  — success.

© Copyright 2013 Laurie Breitner. All rights reserved.

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