Row, Row, Row Your Boat: Are You Missing Warning Signs of Rough Water Ahead?

By Laurie Breitner

Winslow Homer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Rowing Home, Winslow Homer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Do you know what your employees are doing? While you may think you do — perhaps not. Whether yours is a relatively new entity, or one that’s been cruising smoothly for some time, it’s easy for issues to develop and go unexamined in the daily crush of getting the job done. This slow drift off course can interrupt the smooth flow that results when all your employees pull together.

These real world stories illustrate what can happen.

  • The owner of company that sells through external, commission-based sales staff was very surprised to learn that the 3:00 PM cutoff for same-day orders was being routinely ignored. Fulfillment staff — operating on the assumption that the owner knew and approved — struggled to satisfy orders that arrived later and later. Sales staff had quickly learned that fulfillment workers were staying late to process orders and took full advantage of an ever broadening window to call in their sales. Employee morale had begun to plummet and “sick” days to increase.
  • A tech company owner could see his staff was buried but didn’t have time to examine why. Overtime hours (and resultant costs) grew and employees seemed frazzled. The owner was wearing so many different hats  — executive, senior technician, salesman, and accountant — he didn’t have time to look into what was happening. Profits margins were eroding and he worried that his skilled workers could burn out or leave.

Many business owners recognize when things aren’t right. But because root causes can be hard to find and talking to employees without a solution can be uncomfortable, some find it tempting to simply hope the situation will improve without taking action. Left unattended what starts as a small problem can rapidly become a crisis; in my experience, it’s best to act swiftly. The longer a problem persists, the harder it is to fix.

The first step is to identify issues as early as possible. What might alert you to potential problems?

  • Declining morale is often the earliest and most obvious sign that everyone is not in sync. Symptoms include increased squabbling, turnover, absenteeism and tardiness, complaints about co-workers, cynicism and/or employees acting as if they are “checked out.” One business owner asked me, why couldn’t it be the way it used to be, everyone pulling together? Do you ever wonder that?
  • An unexpected increase in cost of goods sold (CoGS) and/or decrease in overall profitability are signs that inefficiencies may be creeping in. As a business grows and becomes more complex, spending time to design new workflows or clarify roles and responsibilities often takes a back seat to just getting through each day’s work. Whether your organization has grown, taken on new customers, changed computer systems or begun offering new services, involve affected employees in determining necessary adjustments. Otherwise, you may find gaps and/or overlaps, that is, more than one person feels responsible for a new task or no one does it; either can lead to trouble.
  • Unanticipated defections (or reductions in volume of purchases) of existing customers or an overall drop off in sales may result from dissatisfaction with your company. Front line employees are your organization’s ambassadors. If they are discontent, your customers will sense it and may shy away. Similarly, if a new computer system or vendor causes disruptions in the smooth flow of work, the quality of your products or services may suffer sending customers to the competition And, sadly, long-time customers may be uncomfortable raising their concerns with you, the owner, and just disappear.

While these are common signs, each organization is unique; no list of triggers can be exhaustive.

Here’s where your business plan comes in handy. If you have projected what will occur in terms of sales, staffing, and profitability — and documented your assumptions, of course — you can look periodically (at least monthly) for any deviations from what you thought would happen. Work with employees to get to the bottom of unexpected results — whether they are better or worse. Most employees sincerely want to do a good job and will appreciate being involved.

Are you looking for other ideas to help create and maintain a harmonious and efficient organization?

In my next few posts I’ll explore how to get and keep your organization on track, including ways to address inefficiencies and issues related to employee discontent.

© Copyright 2013 Laurie Breitner. All rights reserved.

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