Focus Early on the Value Proposition to Help Manage New Market and New Product Risks

By Karen Utgoff

Savvy small business owners and startup teams take time to develop, test, and validate assumed value proposition(s) before making a significant investment in a new market or new product. This is a cost effective way to learn whether — and how — to best pursue opportunities. Be smart. Include this step early in your new product development and/or market launch planning efforts.

Is this really necessary? The further a new market or new product is from your current business, the more value-proposition-based, hypothesis-driven approaches are likely to increase your probability of success, help avoid missteps, and minimize the cost of failure. It’s better to recognize a gap between what you think and what your market needs while you have the flexibility to improve product-market fit; if there is an incurable mismatch, it’s better to “fail fast and cheap,” especially if there would have been a big investment. Concerned that this just adds to your costs? Consider the wasted resources and employee demotivation associated with failure of a new product, especially when better alignment between product and customer needs might have led to success.

Before sinking dollars and employee time into a new market or product/service offering, develop a hypothetical value proposition. Use this as your starting assumption as you test, revise, and pivot to achieve the best possible fit between product/services, new target customers/markets and your business goals. Many believe this type of effort is just for startups but it’s very useful for any company ambitious to grow beyond familiar territory. This is different from the process Laurie Breitner describes to take advantage of the existing customer relationships and knowledge a team accumulates over time to clarify and confirm value propositions for established products in well understood markets.

Test your hypothetical value proposition to corroborate, refute, revise, and reinvent before making a big commitment. While methods for doing this aren’t foolproof, you will be amazed at what you can learn. The fundamental idea is to get feedback from customers and influencers early in the process. While this may reveal painful truths, it’s much better than discovering them after building the wrong inventory, focusing on disinterested customers, or setting prices too high or too low.

Three low-cost methods are within reach of most small businesses and new ventures. Each has its strengths. They are not mutually exclusive and are most effective when customized to apply to the particulars of each situation. In all cases, focus on learning not selling.

  • Observe potential users going about their daily routines. See how potential customers currently solve a problem and why they might value your alternative solution. These opportunities take some finesse to structure but cost little and — with the right frame of mind — can deepen your understanding of customers, improve your product, and clarify the value proposition. If you are contemplating entering a new market with an existing (or new) product, this method may work best as a next step with your interviewees (see below). If you are developing a new product for existing customers, it can build on established relationships.
  • Interview potential customers, influencers, distributors, and partners to gauge their attitudes and get their input. Your hypothetical value proposition embodies assumptions about what problems are important to potential customers and what they value in a new solution. One-on-one interviewing lets you test those assumptions and make changes to the value proposition, change the product design, and/or redefine the target market. Plan on devoting significant effort to interviews and to processing what you hear from each interviewee. These videos provide a good general guidance on planning, conducting and learning from interviews as a starting point; different situations, products, industries and customer segments require variations on this approach.
  • Test a pre-commercial (prototype) product by putting it in the hands of potential customers. Recruit a small group of thought leaders, early adopters, and (if you have them) interested customers to individually give you feedback on a prototype. There is nothing like getting an early version into customers’ hands to learn if the form factor, instructions, and performance meet their needs and it’s much better to improve the product before investing in inventory, advertising, and other expensive aspects of a product launch. Interviewing and observing this group maximizes learning — there is no survey that can follow up on interesting remarks or probe for more detail the way a skilled, well-prepared, objective, and curious interviewer can.

Who says you never get a second chance to make a first impression? All three of the above methods enable you to test your ideas, assumptions and decisions. To make the most of them and to preserve your chance for future “first” impressions, follow two rules:

  • Don’t argue with or disparage the expertise of interviewees or others with whom you engage. Be sure not to insist your assumptions are correct or preach that your product is “better.” Instead, acknowledge that you don’t have all the answers and appreciate the opportunity to learn from them. If you need to drill down for more detail, resist the urge to dissect the details in favor of asking open ended questions such as: “Why?” “How?” or “Can you tell me more?”
  • Be considerate. If interviewees are interested in spending more time with you than planned, be encouraged; but do not stay past your allotted time unless invited to do so. Be sure to thank everyone for their time and help. Ask if you may come back to clarify, ask more questions, or share future progress. An enthusiastic “yes” is a good indicator that you are on the right track.

When to begin? It is essential to begin early in the product or market definition/development process while you still have the flexibility, time, and resources to pivot. When well done, using hypothesis-based methods to craft, test, and refine an initially assumed value proposition can help to assure that product development and market development efforts are well-aligned and attuned to customers in initiatives that move forward. This increases the likelihood of success while reducing the risk that further investment will be off target.

 

 

© Copyright 2017 Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.

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