Searching for Product-Market Fit? Four Common Pitfalls and Ways to Avoid Them

By Karen Utgoff

P1050274

Death Valley (© Dan VanHassel. All rights reserved)

Finding product-market fit before investing in full-fledged product or venture development can save money, prevent missteps, reduce risk, and execute effectively. An effective search for product-market fit is essential to realize these benefits. This process involves identifying, testing, and adjusting key assumptions to find the right product for the right market. In my experience four common pitfalls can undermine that search and the resulting outcomes.

Overlooking key assumptions

It is all too easy to overlook key assumptions for future success and thus generally better to start with too many than to miss critical ones. If need be, separate the wheat from the chafe by asking “How would it impact our business if X is not true?” It is also important to recognize and test additional key assumptions that arise during the search process.

Designing hypotheses that aren’t testable

Many searches start with vague hypotheses, often because that is the best that can be done based on current information. As more is learned, hypotheses should quickly become more substantial and measurable. For example, “Clean drinking water is needed in disaster areas” becomes “Lack of clean drinking water causes two or more days of illness in more than 25% of the people living in disaster zones.”

Pivoting too much or not enough

It’s easy to overreact or underreact as you gain evidence to support or refute key assumptions. Pivots should happen when one or more key assumptions are invalidated based on an accumulation of evidence and insight. How much evidence is enough can be tough to gauge. Resist the urge to pivot based on a single or very few data points. Conversely, resist the urge to cling to assumptions for which there is little or no confirming information despite your best efforts.

Fooling yourself

It is easy for entrepreneurs and product champions to misread information gathered in the search for product-market fit. Thick-skinned optimists may be too mindful of how hard they have worked hard on their idea and draw strength when friends and colleagues express casual interest. They may dismiss potential customers’ difficult questions with “they just don’t get it.” Worriers and overly sensitive souls may fool themselves in the opposite direction; hearing every constructive question as a rejection. If either of these sounds familiar, consider that you may be turning a blind-eye to the very evidence that could lead you to product-market fit and future success.

Minimizing missteps

Be aware of blind spots and biases that can interfere with your seeing the situation clearly. We all have them; being mindful of these weaknesses will make you stronger.

Use a team approach to the search for product-market fit. Assemble a team with different perspectives to work together on the search. Be sure to include people with different skills and outlooks to reduce the risk of group think. Empower each team member to disagree without being disagreeable. Whether you are defining key assumptions, designing hypotheses or deciding on a pivot, consider assigning devil’s advocate duties to a team member or adviser who will ask tough questions and doubt conventional wisdom.

Don’t depend on your team or yourself to instinctively sense product-market fit. Instead, define it based on meaningful and measurable metrics in advance so that everyone on the team agrees on what success will look like and be able to recognize it if and when it happens. As you learn more through your search efforts, these indicators will change but this will be grounded in an informed business decision made after thorough discussion rather than a seat-of-the-pants change that slips through unnoticed.

 

© Copyright 2017 Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s