Tag Archives: change

Five Steps to Inspire Business Change and Growth

By Laurie Breitner

Perhaps you’ve had this thought: If only we could work more effectively as a team, respond well to last minute orders or implement a new computer system. Most employers know what they’d like to change about their businesses, but many aren’t sure what steps to take to make it happen. Whether you want to shape a more effective organization or significantly expand your business, here are tips on what you can do to refocus your organization and change its cultural habits.

Establish a climate for change. People often resist change; change is facilitated when the status quo becomes uncomfortable. What can you do to encourage transformation? This may seem odd, but you need to let your organization — including yourself — feel pain. Openly discuss dissatisfaction with those things you’d like to be different.

Inspire your organization to take action. Create a compelling vision of how things could be better. Meet with everyone whose help you’ll need to be successful — your employees, suppliers, vendors, advisers and even selected customers — to talk about your plans. Encourage frank discussion of their perception of your organization’s relative strengths and weaknesses. You may learn about hidden problems and avoid potential pitfalls that could derail your plans. Don’t overlook your banker, business and legal advisers and accountant; getting them onboard early may smooth the way when inevitable stumbling blocks arise and you need their help.

Build a strong alliance of people committed to your goals.The role of this alliance of internal and external resources is to help reinforce your vision of the future, eliminate obstacles, generate short-term successes and change habits in your company culture. Find individuals whose opinions are respected, who agree on your vision and are committed to the process for “the duration.” With their assistance, develop realistic, measurable plans. Encourage quick successes; early achievements help to get doubters behind your program. After all, everyone likes to play on a winning team. Identify important milestones and the dates by which you expect to achieve them. Evaluate progress at regular intervals and make mid-course corrections.

Align your organization for success. Ironically, complex changes can be easier to accomplish than small, incremental shifts. In making systemic change, organizations are forced to confront the larger issues of culture and management style that exist in every organization — systems that make incremental change difficult to accomplish. Here are examples of things to consider:

  • Compensation policies
  • Leadership styles
  • Job descriptions
  • Technology and infrastructure
  • Policies and procedures

Look at all the different ways that current cultural habits are reinforced and revamp those systems that encourage people to resist change.

People don’t oppose their own ideas. People who are involved in deciding what and how things will change are more likely to support the effort; in fact, they themselves can be won over simply through their participation! People who don’t get a voice in what happens tend to resist change. To avoid this problem, involve as many people as possible in building consensus about the need for change and in deciding how to make it. This is an important step in building employee engagement.

Communicate. You cannot do too much to get your message across. Here are hints for successful communication:

  • Keep it simple; make sure that messages are clear and easy to understand.
  • Use metaphors, analogies and stories.
  • Send your message in different ways, e.g., e-mail, newsletters, memo, paycheck stuffers, etc.

Be sincere in your commitment. Walk your talk. Lead by example. Act as you want others to act. Make sure that everyone in your organization is “in the loop.” People who aren’t included may actively resist. Laying out your vision for how the business could improve gives everyone a framework to make good long-term decisions and set priorities…and maximizes your chance for success.

© Copyright 2014 Laurie Breitner. All rights reserved.