Tag Archives: funding

Want to Have Your Cake and Equity Too? Consider Non-dilutive Funding

By Karen Utgoff

2016-08-24 Non-dilutive fundingRather than taking a piece of your pie, non-dilutive funding sources offer outside funding and/or in-kind resources that let you have your cake and equity too. While it will never take the place of equity investment, secured debt, or bootstrapping, the right non-dilutive resource can be a great precursor, gap filler, supplement, or complement at critical stages. It’s easy to overlook this category of funding but it’s worth considering whether and how it can add value your new or established business.

The right non-dilutive funding at the right time can help finish a product, validate a market, prepare employees for new challenges, or otherwise advance your efforts.

Non-dilutive resources include:

  • Highly competitive grants programs for technology-driven ventures;
  • Small grants open to any business located in a specific state, city or business district;
  • Crowdfunding to build an initial customer-base complete with pre-orders;
  • Training or internship grants to strengthen the workforce;
  • Innovative foundations with grant programs open to for-profit companies with (or occasionally without) non-profit partners;
  • Accelerators, incubators, and competitions; and
  • In-kind resources that provide expertise, tools or connections that would have otherwise required funding.

Non-dilutive resources aren’t free and come with non-financial burdens similar to equity and debt financing.

  • Resources that don’t meet your needs can take your business seriously off course.
  • Non-financial obligations such as administrative, performance, recognition, audit or reporting requirements may apply.
  • Non-dilutive funding takes time and effort to find and use effectively.

Non-dilutive sources offer benefits beyond immediate support.

  • Success with competitive grants or crowdfunding can help you build the technical and business credibility necessary to secure the right investors.
  • Crowdfunding can prime the pump for future interest in your products.
  • Participation may position you for other opportunities in the future.

This post was inspired by my recent MassChallenge talk on the subject. A big thank you to the MC team for inviting me! See the slides from this talk for web links and additional ideas.

© Copyright Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.

Find Funding That Fits Your Needs

By Karen Utgoff

2014-09-01 Bags on MoneyDoes external funding appear to be an attractive approach for fueling the growth of your business? Before you leap to a particular funding option, consider four possible types — debt, equity, grants, and crowdfunding. I have written about the first three here and the last here. Each of these can come from a number of sources — for example banks, venture capitalists, or family — and, of course, you may want to mix and match.

In addition to considering which types and sources of funding are accessible given your situation, it’s important to take into account the risks associated with each. Below are some general thoughts; be sure to evaluate terms and conditions associated with each specific deal that you may be offered.

What financial risks are you willing to accept? Debt and equity — borrowing or sharing ownership — have different uses, benefits, and risks.

Banks and other commercial lenders may expect you to commit personal assets (homes, possessions and savings) in addition to company assets as collateral. If your business fails, the obligation to repay lives on. Even when businesses do well, they are often subject to unpredictable cash flows that may interfere with the ability to service debt. Using debt to purchase equipment, finance inventory, or bridge the gap between making a sale and collecting the revenue can work well unless there is concern about slow inventory turnover and/or customers stretching the time they take to pay — both common occurrences in a weakened economy or in the face of intensifying competition.

Angel and venture capital investors put their money at risk for the opportunity to financially benefit from ownership of part of your business, which they hope will significantly increase in value. Their initial investment may be in the form of convertible debt. To protect their position, investors may expect to participate in key decisions and serve on your board of directors. It’s important to understand the obligations that will result if the business fails; ideally investors will agree to take cash and remaining assets but not expect to get their original investment back. Be sure you understand when investors will want to realize a return on their investment. They may expect you to sell the company or to raise the cash to buy them out.

The risks associated with grants and crowdfunding are usually less daunting but can require some specific result such as delivery of a product, recognition of the funder, execution of a proposed project, and/or a report. Grant givers may also have specific accounting requirements or other standard terms you will need to satisfy.

What personal risks are you willing to take on? Even (or especially) when your friends and families are enthusiastic to help your business and spare you financial risks that come with borrowing from a bank or alternative lender, don’t underestimate possible damage to friendships, marriages, and parent-child relationships that could result. Whether you take a loan or offer them equity, they may have naïve and overconfident assumptions about future success.

Consider how you and they would get along if the business falls short of their expectations. Even if you were not obligated to repay in the event of a business failure, how would you feel if your parents or siblings lost their retirement funds?

Even when the business thrives, dealing with family/friend investors/lenders can become awkward. Some may want to help even when they lack the expertise to do so. Others may feel entitled to participate in operating decisions, suggest potential employees or drop in to “see how things are going.” What’s the plan to provide a return on their investment? To avoid awkwardness, or complicating future rounds of funding, clarify expectations and boundaries in advance. A sophisticated investor will welcome this too and may even take the lead on designing an arrangement that makes sense from both business and personal perspectives.

Can you mitigate the risks of and/or reduce your need for funding? While risks associated with external financing are significant, rewards can be substantial. Be sure you are ready to put the funds to work effectively and to make the most of every dollar. Will your team be prepared to make the most of the new opportunities to which the funding will be directed? Could you improve your cash flow to minimize the risk of problematic surprises? Is it possible to reduce the cash tied up in inventory? Is there a contingency plan to manage setbacks and unexpected obstacles?

Do you have evidence, or merely hope, that you will succeed? Whether the funding you seek is to purchase equipment that will increase the efficiency and profitability, to support the launch of a new product/service/location, or to provide stability over a tough period, you should do your homework. Since all forms of funding come with real costs, it’s important that you have evidence that the expected results will be worth the added burden. Will the changes you anticipate make your business stronger? Will they increase its value?

The right financing at the right time can fuel success. The above points are not intended to discourage you from seeking external funding. If they have, ask yourself why? Resolving those concerns can make for a stronger future business.

 

Related articles:

 

 

© Copyright Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.

Look Before You Leap

By Laurie Breitner

Public domain. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jeremy T. Lock

U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jeremy T. Lock. Public domain.

Too many entrepreneurs believe raising funds to finance their idea is a first step when starting a new business or expanding an existing one. Some create business plans — often only to satisfy lending guidelines — and head off to shop their ideas at banks or other funding sources. I have known people who depleted their retirement savings, put their homes at risk, and/or tapped friends and relatives with promises of great returns only to discover that they had not done their homework.

While starting or growing a business always involves some risk, none of us wants to take on more than is necessary. Before taking a financial leap, be certain that you can answer these questions thoroughly and with confidence — that is, you have some empirical evidence and/or analysis to back up your passion:

Does your plan have legs? Have you tested your idea to determine that you know and can reach your target market and that your planned offering meets their needs? Please don’t assume that if you “build a better mousetrap” that people will flock to your door to buy one. Instead, talk to potential customers; gauge their interest and learn more about their needs and some obstacles you will likely have to overcome. Also, consider the competition — there is always competition — for your target market’s dollars. How would your business woo customers?

What resources do you have/will you need to be successful? It is essential to have as full an understanding as possible of what resources (expertise, suppliers, location, marketing collateral, forms/contracts, etc.) you have and will need to be successful. If you plan a foray into a new business or market, find someone to help you better detail what’s needed. Consider visiting a library to access industry surveys and statistics (UMass Business Library), getting how-to information from industry associations, talking to business owners in a similar business that serve different geographical markets, and checking out industry discussions on LinkedIn and other web sources.

How long will it be before your plan starts generating revenue? Is your product/service well understood, or will you need to mount an educational effort to explain its uses and benefits? Consider your sales cycle (the elapsed time from initial contact to receiving payment). Do customers make buying decisions immediately, or is there a delay to get approvals, consider alternatives, etc. Typically, how quickly does your target market pay? If you plan to open a retail store, you could realistically expect payment at purchase. If, however, you plan to sell to government agencies, expect significant delays.

Can you start smaller? Many entrepreneurs are so bullish on their products/services and excited by their potential that they seek to fulfill the needs of multiple markets with a range of offerings. What is your low-hanging fruit? Is there a niche market that you could enter to build a satisfied/loyal customer base? Consider starting small to learn what works — and doesn’t — before making a larger investment.

How much will it really take to get your plan off the ground? It’s generally safer to be conservative; no one goes out of business by having too much cash. Before you head off to borrow money, consider whether you could fund your initial foray with cash from on-going operations? For a new venture, is it possible to keep your current job (and income) while building your new business on the side? Many couples/partners who want to open a joint business do so by having one work in the new business and the other stay in their current job to keep the financial boat afloat until the new venture starts to make enough money to support both. Typically it takes about 3 years for a new business to be able to support its owner.

How will you measure success? Some entrepreneurs wait until they start generating P&Ls (profit and loss statements) before looking at results. Instead, put together a project plan (with measurable milestones) as early as possible. This is difficult to do, especially without a history of operating results, but the process will help you think through the business challenges ahead. The information you need for your guesstimates will help you with early steps for the business itself — e.g., identify/vet suppliers, develop a sales plan and marketing materials, etc. — and become one yardstick to measure your progress. Adjust revenue projections and planned expenses as you learn. By having a documented plan to help you monitor progress, you will be more nimble and able to uncover small speed bumps before they become major obstacles.

If you learn that you will need outside funding, most banks and other funding sources will appreciate your diligence. And, you will have more confidence during the inevitable tough times when you are doing all the essential pre-work before your earn that satisfying first dollar from your new venture.

© Copyright Laurie Breitner. All rights reserved.

About Crowdfunding: Advice from the Experts and the Experienced

By Karen Utgoff

Courtesy of Wild Rumpus New Music Collective

Courtesy of Wild Rumpus New Music Collective

Crowdfunding is a tantalizing vehicle for overcoming the funding gap for a wide variety of endeavors including arts organizations, new products/services and entire companies. The Kauffman Foundation offers two highly informative videos that give the 50,000-foot summary as well as the view from the trenches.

The first video is 90-minutes long crowdfunding primer (you won’t miss a thing if you fast forward through the first 4 minutes and 30 seconds) and includes:

  • An overview of the crowdfunding space from Jase Wilson, founder of Neighbor.ly
  • The story of their successful Kickstarter campaign from Trellie co-founders Jason Reid and Claude Aldridge
  • Data-driven insights on Kickstarter project practices from Nate Allen, founder and CEO, at the data visualization studio 4 First Names

Key takeaways:

  • The money is a bonus. The opportunity to build awareness and visibility as well as to engage with fans and/or customers is equally or more valuable.
  • Effective marketing is crucial. You need a plan to bring the crowd to your project. It will be hard work.
  • Conducting a crowdfunding campaign will take more time and work than you expect.
  • Pick the platform based on your project, needs, and target crowd.
  • Be mindful of the work that will be required and costs that will be incurred to fulfill incentives, meet obligations, and communicate with backers if your campaign is successful.

The second video on “How to Raise $1 Million in 30 Days” features Indiegogo founder Slava Rubin. He describes elements that are believed to be important in building successful crowdfunding campaigns based on Indiegogo data.

(c) Copyright Sarah Concannon. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

(c) Copyright Sarah Concannon. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

I’m very appreciative that the Kauffman Foundation has posted both of these. They shed more light than heat on crowdfunding as a potentially valuable resource for bridging the funding and awareness gaps that so many emerging businesses, arts organizations and non-profits face. As such, they are must-see material for anyone considering going the crowdfunding route on the innovation trail.

Finally, a big shout out to two of my favorite Kickstarter campaigns:

Congratulations to both on their successful campaigns.

Gap Files 2

© Copyright 2014 Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.

Navigating the Innovation Trail: Canyons, Chasms and Sinkholes! Oh My!

By Karen Utgoff

Death Valley (© Dan VanHassel. All rights reserved)

Death Valley (© Dan VanHassel. All rights reserved)

For both innovation-driven new ventures and intrapreneurs in well-established businesses, the road to new business success is frequently rocky and interrupted by gaps large and small. Often the team needs to build the road as it creates the product.  In addition to the significant canyons and chasms along the way, there are many smaller sinkholes that can swallow you and deceptively promising blind alleys that can take you off course. If you decide to blaze an innovation trail, here are some of the challenges you can expect to encounter.

Death Valley (© Dan VanHassel. All rights reserved)

Death Valley (© Dan VanHassel. All rights reserved)

The long, dry valley of death (pdf) between idea and fundable business is treacherous. Your team (and your idea) can die of thirst! Can you convince an angel, venture capitalist, funding agency, your company, or bank to invest, allocate, grant or lend your team what it needs? Can you make your current cash last long enough to see you through or are you counting on “rain” before your checking account runs dry? Be sure to consider carefully what you will need to make it across.

The labyrinth to the first customer is filled with blind alleys that can easily disorient even savvy navigators. Some will never find their way back to the main road. The biggest danger is potential customers who never say “no” but never decide to buy. The sale feels so close. You keep thinking one more meeting will do the trick, making all the time and effort you have invested suddenly worthwhile. It’s so hard to tell the difference between sincere interest from a future customer and someone who simply doesn’t want to offend by saying “no.”

The chasm between first customers and the main market was made famous by Geoffrey Moore in his landmark book Crossing the Chasm: Marketing and Selling High-Tech Products to Mainstream Customers, which analyzed the challenges of growing beyond the first few, true-believing customers to achieve mass market adoption. It can be uncomfortable to move beyond your base of support but to achieve significant growth it must be done.

Cash flow sinkholes often develop on short notice. Even well-funded companies fall into them. There are many causes — for example, a new employee who isn’t productive or an unexpectedly problematic feature of the product — that can undermine your cash flow. It’s easy to spin your wheels in a futile effort to move forward but that only digs a deeper hole. The sooner you realize the underlying problem and fix it, the better.

The high growth grand prix comes just as you think you are home free. Suddenly your Gap Files 2business is growing faster than you thought possible and continuing to accelerate. You can’t take your eyes off the road for a second. Threats and opportunities are coming from all directions and with greater speed. You need to develop habits, processes, systems, and instincts to keep you alive and growing. The good news is that, for those who are brave and persistent enough to navigate through, success can be very sweet.

© Copyright 2013 Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.