Tag Archives: human resources

Five Steps to Inspire Business Change and Growth

By Laurie Breitner

Perhaps you’ve had this thought: If only we could work more effectively as a team, respond well to last minute orders or implement a new computer system. Most employers know what they’d like to change about their businesses, but many aren’t sure what steps to take to make it happen. Whether you want to shape a more effective organization or significantly expand your business, here are tips on what you can do to refocus your organization and change its cultural habits.

Establish a climate for change. People often resist change; change is facilitated when the status quo becomes uncomfortable. What can you do to encourage transformation? This may seem odd, but you need to let your organization — including yourself — feel pain. Openly discuss dissatisfaction with those things you’d like to be different.

Inspire your organization to take action. Create a compelling vision of how things could be better. Meet with everyone whose help you’ll need to be successful — your employees, suppliers, vendors, advisers and even selected customers — to talk about your plans. Encourage frank discussion of their perception of your organization’s relative strengths and weaknesses. You may learn about hidden problems and avoid potential pitfalls that could derail your plans. Don’t overlook your banker, business and legal advisers and accountant; getting them onboard early may smooth the way when inevitable stumbling blocks arise and you need their help.

Build a strong alliance of people committed to your goals.The role of this alliance of internal and external resources is to help reinforce your vision of the future, eliminate obstacles, generate short-term successes and change habits in your company culture. Find individuals whose opinions are respected, who agree on your vision and are committed to the process for “the duration.” With their assistance, develop realistic, measurable plans. Encourage quick successes; early achievements help to get doubters behind your program. After all, everyone likes to play on a winning team. Identify important milestones and the dates by which you expect to achieve them. Evaluate progress at regular intervals and make mid-course corrections.

Align your organization for success. Ironically, complex changes can be easier to accomplish than small, incremental shifts. In making systemic change, organizations are forced to confront the larger issues of culture and management style that exist in every organization — systems that make incremental change difficult to accomplish. Here are examples of things to consider:

  • Compensation policies
  • Leadership styles
  • Job descriptions
  • Technology and infrastructure
  • Policies and procedures

Look at all the different ways that current cultural habits are reinforced and revamp those systems that encourage people to resist change.

People don’t oppose their own ideas. People who are involved in deciding what and how things will change are more likely to support the effort; in fact, they themselves can be won over simply through their participation! People who don’t get a voice in what happens tend to resist change. To avoid this problem, involve as many people as possible in building consensus about the need for change and in deciding how to make it. This is an important step in building employee engagement.

Communicate. You cannot do too much to get your message across. Here are hints for successful communication:

  • Keep it simple; make sure that messages are clear and easy to understand.
  • Use metaphors, analogies and stories.
  • Send your message in different ways, e.g., e-mail, newsletters, memo, paycheck stuffers, etc.

Be sincere in your commitment. Walk your talk. Lead by example. Act as you want others to act. Make sure that everyone in your organization is “in the loop.” People who aren’t included may actively resist. Laying out your vision for how the business could improve gives everyone a framework to make good long-term decisions and set priorities…and maximizes your chance for success.

© Copyright 2014 Laurie Breitner. All rights reserved.

From New Employee to Productive Colleague

By Laurie Breitner

09-01-13 image for LCB postAs I write this I’m watching a parade of  students being introduced to their new environment. Colleges and universities have a lot of practice doing this; each fall they handle an influx of new students, make them welcome and integrate them into an existing culture — that is, they lay the foundation for students’ success in college and beyond. Few businesses do that so routinely. Should your business take a page from their playbook and put in place practices to orient and engage new employees? This HBR post by John Baldoni speaks to the many possible payoffs for companies with more engaged employees.

While each workplace is unique, here are a few essentials to consider when putting together your employee orientation program.

1) Overview – Incoming employees who understand your organization and how their new role fits in it will be better able to contribute. In addition to one-on-ones with supervisors and human resource staff, provide information about your company’s “big picture” — ideally in an online repository that can be kept current. Include your mission, vision, and annual company-wide and department goals and, of course, how they are measured. Each employee should be given an up-to-date job description for their role (and, ideally, everyone else’s), an employee handbook, and be informed about your performance evaluation process including any probationary period. Other helpful information is your company organization chart, and background material that describe your company’s products and services, target market(s) and, if appropriate, major customers and influencers.

2) The basics – At minimum everyone should have access to your company directory with telephone numbers, email addresses and office locations. Is there a calendar of planned meetings, social events and holidays? Do most departments have set periodic meetings, and if so, who leads them, creates agendas and where are they held? Include information about how people typically dress and details of what you mean by, for example, “business casual.” Consider using candid photos of current employees (with names beneath) so people can start putting names with faces and see examples of how people dress. Long before Facebook (the company), schools routinely created a school face book of all students including names, what they like to be called (e.g., he prefers James, never Jim or Jimmy), their dorm and interests. Could something like that work at your business?

And, there are practical matters. Who buys/makes the coffee? Do employees take turns on KP (kitchen patrol) or is that duty assigned to a particular employee or cleaning service? Is the refrigerator emptied every Friday of all but marked items? What do new employees need to feel a valued part of your organization?

3) Resources – There’s a lot to find out. Do you have a company intranet or other data repositories? New employees will feel more welcomed and become productive more quickly if you save them the trouble of having to hunt for routine information such as reserving conference rooms, the location of the supply closet, and office kitchen. Outside-the-office information such as area restaurants (menus and how to get there) or places to exercise and shop are helpful.

4) Mentor – Even with all this, newbies may have questions or concerns they feel uncomfortable raising with a superior or co-worker. Or, they might need guidance on company culture. If you have more than a handful of employees, consider pairing each new employee with a seasoned worker, ideally not a boss. Clearly the mentor must have the right interpersonal skills, volunteer, and enjoy the responsibility. Surveys consistently report that a top reason people give for being happy at work is whether they have a friend, e.g., feel personally connected. I am amazed at how long some of these relationships persist. In the late nineties I paired a new employee (from India, as it happened) with a willing mentor. They are still friends almost 20 years later.

What specific challenges will employees face in your organization? To get in touch with what new employees need, think back to jobs you have had and your first day or first week; involve current employees in putting information together. Given the expense of recruiting and hiring, it makes sense to invest a little more to give your new hires a good foundation for their — and by extension, your company’s  — success.

© Copyright 2013 Laurie Breitner. All rights reserved.

Team Performance: Lessons from String Quartets

By Karen Utgoff

As the only non-musician in my nuclear family, I have attended many concerts and recitals offered by students and pros. These range from big orchestra and choral performances to small solo events. Over the years, I have found watching string quartets especially fascinating. In addition to the music, each performance is a study in teamwork that offers a model — whether in the context of an established business, a non-profit organization, or a startup — that many business teams would do well to emulate.

The Chiara Quartet. Photo by Christian Steiner

The Chiara Quartet. Photo by Christian Steiner

A string quartet has a lot in common with teams as defined by Jon R. Katzenbach and Douglas K. Smith in their classic Harvard Business Review article “The Discipline of Teams” ( July-August 2005):

“A team is a small number of people with complementary skills who are committed to a common purpose, set of performance goals and approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable.”

“The essence of a team is common commitment. Without it, groups perform as individuals; with it, they become a powerful unit of collective performance.”

These characteristics are certainly true of successful string quartets at all levels.  Here are some other observations about these musical teams that inform business teams by shedding a different light on some common issues:

Challenging, shared, clearly defined, performance-related goals provide focus for team efforts. Working toward a particular performance seems obvious for a quartet — the team naturally and continuously aims for a result that goes beyond what its members can achieve individually. And, their goal is clear, be ready to perform on the scheduled day. Project-oriented business teams often find defining goals and timelines less straightforward; but it is no less essential. Defined goals and clear timetables create valuable motivators as well as a shared focus, sense of urgency and standard for measuring success.

The Chiara Quartet is one that I particularly enjoy watching, so I was interested to read about their new performance goal:

“For almost all of the Quartet’s upcoming concerts, they’ll be performing by heart.  After spending countless hours working towards playing their repertoire from memory, they now feel that the sheet music is a distraction to the performance, instead of an aid.”

For those who would like to learn more, here are some examples of the Quartet in performance and practicing together.

Team members’ specific, complementary skills enable team performance. Every string quartet needs two violinists, a violist, and a cellist. If one is missing, you don’t have a string quartet. In much the same way, business teams need members who bring specific skills to the group. Unlike a quartet, the basic mix of skills needed on a project-focused business team is not always obvious. For example, a new venture team may start out with science and engineering expertise and only later realize the need for expertise in venture finance and entrepreneurial marketing.

Well-defined roles and responsibilities help eliminate gaps and overlaps. In a quartet, essential roles and responsibilities are obvious; each member has his/her own instrument and sheet music, which defines the part to be played. It’s ridiculous to think of a musician arbitrarily playing another performer’s part or that a part would be overlooked. Unfortunately both happen on business teams if they don’t take the time to clarify who is doing what. High-performing teams work together to define individual responsibilities. This clarity is the foundation for mutual respect for individual roles and accountability but shouldn’t be inflexible, as all team members share the responsibility for achieving the team’s goals and improvising solutions to unanticipated challenges.

Good communication and situational awareness are essential if the whole is to become more than the sum of its parts. As a parent of a violinist, violist and cellist, it was fascinating to see novice quartet members learning how to be good team members. The hard part began at the first team meeting. Although each member had learned his/her part in advance, they needed to learn how to share ideas and be aware of each other before they could put the parts together and perform as a group. When something unexpected happened — a missed cue — it was the ability of the individual performers to notice and support one another that allowed them to get back together and demonstrated their strength as a team.

Many professional quartets exhibit these qualities throughout their performances with eye contact, nods, and watching each other as they each play their individual parts. Leadership shifts seamlessly from one performer to another as the piece progresses.  When a quartet seems to be four individuals playing without regard for one another the performance suffers. I don’t know if this is the music itself or the overall impression it makes on the audience. Is there something here that might help your team make a more compelling presentation to management or an investor?

For more on elements that support team performance, I urge you to check out the Katzenbach and Smith article mentioned earlier and to take the opportunity to watch and be inspired by high-performing teams from other fields.

© Copyright 2013 Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.

To Tell or Not to Tell?

By Laurie Breitner

Your healthcare practice is doing well. After some tough beginning years you’ve added partners and pulled away from the pack by learning not only how to survive — but better yet — how to thrive in a changing regulatory climate.

You and your partners feel it’s time to expand geographically. You found a practice in a nearby town that seems to present an opportunity. Despite their large patient base, they aren’t doing as well as they might financially and the senior partners are ready to retire. A deal is struck and a take over date picked — three months hence. You plan to keep the current support staff and remaining clinicians at the current location, and expect to retain the bulk of the patients, reasoning the key to that is staff retention.

Only your partners and a couple senior staff are included in transition planning. No else one in your current operation and no one at all in the “new” practice is informed, which raises the question: when do we let everyone else know?

A couple of your partners argue for immediate and full disclosure. Get everyone together, share the good news — because it really is good news — and get them involved in the transition.  They feel some staff might leave, but overall, there would be better buy-in.

Others are concerned about staff in the acquired practice seeking employment elsewhere over the course of the next three months. Who would want to stay on knowing that they would have to cope with a transition? Better to tell them the day the transition is effective. There might be some initial discontent, but if they were told on Monday morning, they’d have to pull together to serve the patients scheduled to arrive.

There is no consensus. You’re the one who started this practice. All eyes are on you. What do you say?

First take a deep breath. Ask yourself, what are you trying to accomplish?

This is a long-term play and in the long run you want a larger, financially viable practice. You know that while patients are often loyal to their doctors, it’s the staff that keeps the business on track. Schedulers, billing staff, nurses, and technicians support you and your partners. Can you really afford to keep them in the dark? Is that a way to start a new relationship? How would you feel if the roles were reversed?

Is there another way? You have an opportunity to build a good long-term relationship with the new team, which should minimize possible turnover in your current operation and in the one you’re acquiring. A little selling is involved. So, get the group together and tell them the good news. Plan to have one-on-ones with (at a minimum) key staff — ideally everyone — to answer their questions, make new staff feel welcome, and current staff feel appreciated. Hear, and if possible use, their ideas for the transition. Listen to those who mourn the loss of what was; those feelings will pass more quickly if they are acknowledged. Let everyone know how much you respect and appreciate them. Encourage them to be part of the future you envision.

Remind yourself and others that this good thing for both practices. There will be more opportunity for staff advancement, better job security, and additional coverage. Patients will have more choices of locations and practitioners and perhaps even longer office hours — one office could cover early hours and the other late; there would be many possibilities with a bigger practice.

Keep everyone informed of progress or even lack thereof. Email or written updates posted where everyone will see the latest news will suffice between formal meetings. Show your appreciation for all the hard work and acknowledge the extra work that your current and new staff does to make the transition go smoothly. Consider some kind of celebration to start building those critical relationships between people.

Wouldn’t it feel better to start off this new chapter with honest communication as a foundation for future employee-employer relationships? Once past this hurdle, you can turn to the question of how best to inform future patients and others in your new community.

© Copyright 2013 Laurie Breitner. All rights reserved.