Tag Archives: intrapreneurship

Keep Your Business on Track and Growing: Measure What Matters

By Laurie Breitner and Karen Utgoff

There is more to keeping your business going in the right direction than looking at standard reports from QuickBooks or other accounting tools on a regular basis. While these reports can give you numbers, determining and appropriately tracking what matters — which numbers are important, how they are derived and what else you need to watch — is an essential responsibility of the owner(s) and management team.

In assessing current operations, it’s often useful to compare today’s results with past performance — prior period (year, quarter, month, or week) or effort (job run, project, or program) depending on your industry and particulars of your business. While this isn’t always possible for newer ventures, be assured that if you are diligent, ultimately these measurements will help reveal your company’s strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats, as well as performance.

For example, after one year in business you can only guess how seasonal factors will affect your cash flow. However, if you keep track, with five years experience you will be confident in anticipating how seasonal ups and downs might impact your business. When you hire a second employee in a particular role, you have some idea of how long it will take them to come up to speed; by the time you make your fifth such hire, you have a much better idea of how long it should take, as well as what it takes, to be productive.

For new initiatives, measuring is tied closely to looking forward (planning) for likely and intended outcomes. What will initial success look like? What events (milestones) are critical to track progress? How much will it likely cost? Are there gaps in your capabilities or resources that need to be filled before you can realize the potential of the new initiative? How much revenue and/or profit is the project expected to add and when?

What initial operational measures should be monitored? Here’s where it’s helpful to look at assumptions you made in making predictions. Did you assume that if you opened a second location in a nearby town that your strong positive reputation would automatically give a boost to the new site? Did your plan hinge on getting speedy municipal approval for a larger parking lot at the next planning board meeting? What key assumptions do you need to track?

Add to the standard routine of just reviewing (daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annual) results with the following specific approaches that are critically important to measuring what matters:

Assess profitability and the fully allocated cost of goods sold from an operational perspective: For background review pages 8 and 9 of Laurie’s Thriving: Get and keep your business on track. Also, check out Karen’s Succeeding in Small Business post on Four tips for putting your business plan to work for your small business.

Project results for new initiatives with limited or no experience: For background, read Four steps to help small business owners evaluate the financial wisdom of new business-building initiatives and Small business management and entrepreneurship: Two key ingredients for sustaining success.

For additional information read Josh Patrick’s article on Every Business Has a Special Number, or Metric. Do You Know Yours? in the NY Times’ “You’re the Boss” blog and A Winning Culture Keeps Score by John Case and Bill Fotsch in the HBR Blog Network.

Here’s how to get started: On a single page, document the (up to) five most important measures, metrics, milestones, and/or numbers that you follow (or plan to track) to gauge whether you are on the right road, moving into the fast lane, or facing an unwanted detour. Review these metrics with your management team, board of advisers, mentors, and/or appropriate professional services providers. Evaluate them regularly to make sure they remain relevant guides for growing your business. Plan to fine tune them over time as your needs and business landscape change and you learn more.

© 2015 Laurie Breitner and Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.

Six Misunderstandings about the Lean Startup

By Karen Utgoff

Use of Lean Startup techniques is becoming ubiquitous in entrepreneurship circles these days and rightly so. Along with the closely related Lean Launchpad methodology, this highly effective approach puts one essential success factor — fit between customers, markets, products and company — front and center for founders who might previously have defaulted to “If we build it they will come.”

In late 2012 I was privileged to serve as a mentor for a National Science Foundation Innovation Corps team and to be immersed in the Lean Launchpad method first-hand as part of that program. For more information on the team experience and methodology, visit Steve Blank’s blog; the link is in the list of resources at the bottom of this post. Recently, in preparation for a workshop I’m giving, I reread Eric Ries’ The Lean Startup and noted his observation that:

“Throughout our celebration of the success of the Lean Startup movement, a note of caution is essential. We cannot afford to have our success breed a new pseudoscience around pivots, MVPs, and the like.” (Eric Ries. The Lean Startup, p. 279)

This rang true to me and prompted me to write here about several significant misunderstandings that I’ve observed.

Misunderstanding One: Lean Launchpad methodology avoids failure. Actually the Lean Launchpad method and the Lean Startup movement focus on failing faster, at lower cost, and under controlled conditions that enable the team to learn rapidly and pivot effectively.

Misunderstanding Two: The tools and techniques are only for brand new startup ventures. Confusion on this point seems to be around the definition of a startup. I’ve written before about the need for entrepreneurial activity in established businesses and I was glad to rediscover Ries addressing the issue:

“Entrepreneurs who operate inside an established organization sometimes are called “intrapreneurs” because of the special circumstances that attend building a startup within a larger company. As I have applied Lean Startup ideas in an ever-widening variety of companies and industries, I have come to believe that intrapreneurs have much more in common with the rest of the community of entrepreneurs than most people believe.” (Eric Ries. The Lean Startup, pp. 26-27)

That said it’s important to recognize that a new external venture is different from an internal venture within a successfully operating business. Here is an interesting post by Henry Chesborough and my take on the subject as well.

Misunderstanding Three: We’re already customer focused and therefore in sync with the philosophy even if we don’t talk about minimal viable products (MVPs) and pivots. Perhaps, but it isn’t necessarily so; the key is the organization’s capacity to systematically learn. Are activities designed so that customer and market response will lead to insights? Is the team aware of leap-of-faith assumptions? Are your entrepreneurial teams truly cross-functional? Is your culture tolerant of setbacks and supportive of learning?

Misunderstanding Four: It’s about product development. This sells the methodology short. Sure, product development is one aspect but equally important is identifying receptive customer segments (customer discovery/development) and business model development. All three may be subject to change as the team learns.

Misunderstanding Five: It’s about iteration. Iteration is necessary but not sufficient. If you don’t organize and measure in a way that allows you to learn, iteration is just spinning your wheels.

Misunderstanding Six: The Lean Startup approach frees us from needing to worry about mission, vision, competition, intellectual property and so forth. Not so! Your initial hypothesis and pivots will be informed by and inform the evolution of each of these.

I hope this blog serves to clarify the Lean Startup and that it encourages you to try, and then embrace, it. It has a lot to offer ambitious entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs.

Books

  • Steve Blank and Bob Dorf, The Startup Owner’s Manual
  • Alexander Osterwalder et al, Business Model Generation (72 page preview available)
  • Eric Ries, The Lean Startup

Web Resources

© Copyright Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.

Navigating the Innovation Trail: Canyons, Chasms and Sinkholes! Oh My!

By Karen Utgoff

Death Valley (© Dan VanHassel. All rights reserved)

Death Valley (© Dan VanHassel. All rights reserved)

For both innovation-driven new ventures and intrapreneurs in well-established businesses, the road to new business success is frequently rocky and interrupted by gaps large and small. Often the team needs to build the road as it creates the product.  In addition to the significant canyons and chasms along the way, there are many smaller sinkholes that can swallow you and deceptively promising blind alleys that can take you off course. If you decide to blaze an innovation trail, here are some of the challenges you can expect to encounter.

Death Valley (© Dan VanHassel. All rights reserved)

Death Valley (© Dan VanHassel. All rights reserved)

The long, dry valley of death (pdf) between idea and fundable business is treacherous. Your team (and your idea) can die of thirst! Can you convince an angel, venture capitalist, funding agency, your company, or bank to invest, allocate, grant or lend your team what it needs? Can you make your current cash last long enough to see you through or are you counting on “rain” before your checking account runs dry? Be sure to consider carefully what you will need to make it across.

The labyrinth to the first customer is filled with blind alleys that can easily disorient even savvy navigators. Some will never find their way back to the main road. The biggest danger is potential customers who never say “no” but never decide to buy. The sale feels so close. You keep thinking one more meeting will do the trick, making all the time and effort you have invested suddenly worthwhile. It’s so hard to tell the difference between sincere interest from a future customer and someone who simply doesn’t want to offend by saying “no.”

The chasm between first customers and the main market was made famous by Geoffrey Moore in his landmark book Crossing the Chasm: Marketing and Selling High-Tech Products to Mainstream Customers, which analyzed the challenges of growing beyond the first few, true-believing customers to achieve mass market adoption. It can be uncomfortable to move beyond your base of support but to achieve significant growth it must be done.

Cash flow sinkholes often develop on short notice. Even well-funded companies fall into them. There are many causes — for example, a new employee who isn’t productive or an unexpectedly problematic feature of the product — that can undermine your cash flow. It’s easy to spin your wheels in a futile effort to move forward but that only digs a deeper hole. The sooner you realize the underlying problem and fix it, the better.

The high growth grand prix comes just as you think you are home free. Suddenly your Gap Files 2business is growing faster than you thought possible and continuing to accelerate. You can’t take your eyes off the road for a second. Threats and opportunities are coming from all directions and with greater speed. You need to develop habits, processes, systems, and instincts to keep you alive and growing. The good news is that, for those who are brave and persistent enough to navigate through, success can be very sweet.

© Copyright 2013 Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.

Minding the Gaps

By Karen Utgoff

There are many definitions of entrepreneurship. This one is my favorite because it is confirmed completely by my experience:

“Entrepreneurship is the process by which individuals — either on their own or inside organizations — pursue opportunities without regard to resources they currently control” (Stevenson, Roberts, and Grousbeck, 1989)

When a business is in a stable phase of its life cycle, management seeks to optimize expected results within the resources available. In contrast, entrepreneurs, as well as company-based intrapreneurs, seek to overcome or work around gaps in resources, customers, and knowledge to get something new off the ground.

As an operations person, Laurie is especially aware of gaps that could interfere with making the important transition from the entrepreneurial (startup or significant growth mode) to a more stable phase. Putting systems in place to attract, retain and manage employees that consistently and efficiently produce quality goods and services is key.

From a market-oriented business strategy perspective, I’m concerned with gaps in the business model, resources, and reputation that interfere with the ability to start up and grow (new or existing opportunities). A sound approach to developing well-aligned value propositions, competitive differentiators, product/market fit, and marketing/sales tools is key.Gap Files 2

So, expect to read more in The Gap Files about how entrepreneurs leading startup companies or innovation-driven growth initiatives within existing organizations can overcome obstacles, find help, and make do in the face of scarce or nonexistent resources.

© Copyright 2013 Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.