Tag Archives: Lean Launchpad

Six Misunderstandings about the Lean Startup

By Karen Utgoff

Use of Lean Startup techniques is becoming ubiquitous in entrepreneurship circles these days and rightly so. Along with the closely related Lean Launchpad methodology, this highly effective approach puts one essential success factor — fit between customers, markets, products and company — front and center for founders who might previously have defaulted to “If we build it they will come.”

In late 2012 I was privileged to serve as a mentor for a National Science Foundation Innovation Corps team and to be immersed in the Lean Launchpad method first-hand as part of that program. For more information on the team experience and methodology, visit Steve Blank’s blog; the link is in the list of resources at the bottom of this post. Recently, in preparation for a workshop I’m giving, I reread Eric Ries’ The Lean Startup and noted his observation that:

“Throughout our celebration of the success of the Lean Startup movement, a note of caution is essential. We cannot afford to have our success breed a new pseudoscience around pivots, MVPs, and the like.” (Eric Ries. The Lean Startup, p. 279)

This rang true to me and prompted me to write here about several significant misunderstandings that I’ve observed.

Misunderstanding One: Lean Launchpad methodology avoids failure. Actually the Lean Launchpad method and the Lean Startup movement focus on failing faster, at lower cost, and under controlled conditions that enable the team to learn rapidly and pivot effectively.

Misunderstanding Two: The tools and techniques are only for brand new startup ventures. Confusion on this point seems to be around the definition of a startup. I’ve written before about the need for entrepreneurial activity in established businesses and I was glad to rediscover Ries addressing the issue:

“Entrepreneurs who operate inside an established organization sometimes are called “intrapreneurs” because of the special circumstances that attend building a startup within a larger company. As I have applied Lean Startup ideas in an ever-widening variety of companies and industries, I have come to believe that intrapreneurs have much more in common with the rest of the community of entrepreneurs than most people believe.” (Eric Ries. The Lean Startup, pp. 26-27)

That said it’s important to recognize that a new external venture is different from an internal venture within a successfully operating business. Here is an interesting post by Henry Chesborough and my take on the subject as well.

Misunderstanding Three: We’re already customer focused and therefore in sync with the philosophy even if we don’t talk about minimal viable products (MVPs) and pivots. Perhaps, but it isn’t necessarily so; the key is the organization’s capacity to systematically learn. Are activities designed so that customer and market response will lead to insights? Is the team aware of leap-of-faith assumptions? Are your entrepreneurial teams truly cross-functional? Is your culture tolerant of setbacks and supportive of learning?

Misunderstanding Four: It’s about product development. This sells the methodology short. Sure, product development is one aspect but equally important is identifying receptive customer segments (customer discovery/development) and business model development. All three may be subject to change as the team learns.

Misunderstanding Five: It’s about iteration. Iteration is necessary but not sufficient. If you don’t organize and measure in a way that allows you to learn, iteration is just spinning your wheels.

Misunderstanding Six: The Lean Startup approach frees us from needing to worry about mission, vision, competition, intellectual property and so forth. Not so! Your initial hypothesis and pivots will be informed by and inform the evolution of each of these.

I hope this blog serves to clarify the Lean Startup and that it encourages you to try, and then embrace, it. It has a lot to offer ambitious entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs.

Books

  • Steve Blank and Bob Dorf, The Startup Owner’s Manual
  • Alexander Osterwalder et al, Business Model Generation (72 page preview available)
  • Eric Ries, The Lean Startup

Web Resources

© Copyright Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.