Tag Archives: metrics

Keep Your Business on Track and Growing: Measure What Matters

By Laurie Breitner and Karen Utgoff

There is more to keeping your business going in the right direction than looking at standard reports from QuickBooks or other accounting tools on a regular basis. While these reports can give you numbers, determining and appropriately tracking what matters — which numbers are important, how they are derived and what else you need to watch — is an essential responsibility of the owner(s) and management team.

In assessing current operations, it’s often useful to compare today’s results with past performance — prior period (year, quarter, month, or week) or effort (job run, project, or program) depending on your industry and particulars of your business. While this isn’t always possible for newer ventures, be assured that if you are diligent, ultimately these measurements will help reveal your company’s strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats, as well as performance.

For example, after one year in business you can only guess how seasonal factors will affect your cash flow. However, if you keep track, with five years experience you will be confident in anticipating how seasonal ups and downs might impact your business. When you hire a second employee in a particular role, you have some idea of how long it will take them to come up to speed; by the time you make your fifth such hire, you have a much better idea of how long it should take, as well as what it takes, to be productive.

For new initiatives, measuring is tied closely to looking forward (planning) for likely and intended outcomes. What will initial success look like? What events (milestones) are critical to track progress? How much will it likely cost? Are there gaps in your capabilities or resources that need to be filled before you can realize the potential of the new initiative? How much revenue and/or profit is the project expected to add and when?

What initial operational measures should be monitored? Here’s where it’s helpful to look at assumptions you made in making predictions. Did you assume that if you opened a second location in a nearby town that your strong positive reputation would automatically give a boost to the new site? Did your plan hinge on getting speedy municipal approval for a larger parking lot at the next planning board meeting? What key assumptions do you need to track?

Add to the standard routine of just reviewing (daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annual) results with the following specific approaches that are critically important to measuring what matters:

Assess profitability and the fully allocated cost of goods sold from an operational perspective: For background review pages 8 and 9 of Laurie’s Thriving: Get and keep your business on track. Also, check out Karen’s Succeeding in Small Business post on Four tips for putting your business plan to work for your small business.

Project results for new initiatives with limited or no experience: For background, read Four steps to help small business owners evaluate the financial wisdom of new business-building initiatives and Small business management and entrepreneurship: Two key ingredients for sustaining success.

For additional information read Josh Patrick’s article on Every Business Has a Special Number, or Metric. Do You Know Yours? in the NY Times’ “You’re the Boss” blog and A Winning Culture Keeps Score by John Case and Bill Fotsch in the HBR Blog Network.

Here’s how to get started: On a single page, document the (up to) five most important measures, metrics, milestones, and/or numbers that you follow (or plan to track) to gauge whether you are on the right road, moving into the fast lane, or facing an unwanted detour. Review these metrics with your management team, board of advisers, mentors, and/or appropriate professional services providers. Evaluate them regularly to make sure they remain relevant guides for growing your business. Plan to fine tune them over time as your needs and business landscape change and you learn more.

© 2015 Laurie Breitner and Karen Utgoff. All rights reserved.